How to Write a Job Description

Brytanie Killebrew

By on 10/01/19

How to Write a Job Description

Growing your team just got easier. We partnered with Google For Startups to bring you the play-by-play on how to attract the best talent by perfecting the art of the job description.

We've outlined the most important elements to include and showed you exactly how to do it. Plus, you'll get exclusive access to the in-person event slides. Ready to get started? Let's dive in.

This content is brought to you in partnership with Google For Startups.

 

Be human.

Avoid jargon and be simple. That means no run-on sentences and no wordy descriptions. Candidates are humans, and humans want transparency and directness. Start your hiring process with both by keeping your job descriptions simple and human.

Non-human example: Our team is seeking a skilled account manager to strategize communications between our prospective and current corporate brand partners, by way of phone, email and in-person initiatives. 

Human Solution: We're looking to add a new account manager to our team! Interested? Your day-to-day would include prospecting new partners and supporting our current roster (this role would include the possibility to travel).

 

Be gender-neutral.

Replacing "he" or "she" with "you" or "they" is important. Not only does it neutralize how you view the candidate pool and create a more inclusive environment, but it also showcases your company as a conscious group doing their part to combat bias.

Non-gender-neutral example: Our team is looking for an experienced Full Stack Developer. He will be responsible for analyzing and testing responsive web applications. He will also be required to attend weekly meetings with our team of developers, product designers and managers.

Gender-neutral Solution: Our team is looking for an experienced Full Stack Developer, who will be responsible for analyzing and testing responsive web applications. They will also be required to attend weekly meetings with our team of developers, product designers and managers.

 

Be strategic.

Job descriptions should be written to specifically attract the type of candidate you want to hire. That means tailoring your text to include experiences and attitudes prospective candidates have or can relate to.

Non-strategic example: Qualified candidates will have +4-6 years of relevant experience, an understanding of marketing principles and a detail-oriented mindset.

Strategic Solution: We're on the search for experts with +4-6 years of digital marketing experience with focuses on Facebook paid and promoted content, and Google Ad Words. Know your way around campaign metrics and optimizing ad sets? We want to hear from you!

 

Be mindful.

It's important to keep current employees' responsibilities, compensation and benefits in mind when crafting your job descriptions. Nothing is worse the selling a prospective employee on a dream that's not realistic, so be sure to manage expectations responsibly.

Ready to take the next step?

How to Write a Job Description Guide

DOWNLOAD THE GUIDE

 

Need help crafting the perfect job description? We've got you covered👇

Shoot an email over to Allie at allie@repurpose.co.

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